Category Archives: Education

Discussion of the education system. Writings for educational projects.

Iulius Casserius


Giulio Cesare Casseri (1552–1616), whose name was Latinized into Iulius Casserius, was born in Piacenza; therefore, the nickname Piacentino (Placentinus) was often used. According to Sterzi, who based his claim on a statement contained in Casserius’s will, his date of birth was around 1552. It should be noted, however, that although most modern authors accept this date, some still report 1561 as his birth date on the basis of the inscription appearing on the portrait published in Casserius’s work De Vocis Auditusque organis that ascribes to the author the age of 39 years.

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Adriaan van den Spiegel


Adriaan van den Spiegel (or Spieghel), name also written as Spieghel, Spigel, Adrianus Spigelius, Spiegelius, Adriano Spigeli. He was a Flemish anatomist and botanist, born 1578, in Brussels; died April 7, 1625, in Padua, Italy. Adriaan Read the rest of this entry

Leonardo da Vinci


I love those who can smile in trouble, who can gather strength from distress, and grow brave by reflection. ‘Tis the business of little minds to shrink, but they whose heart is firm, and whose conscience approves their conduct, will pursue their principles unto death.” – Leonardo da Vinci

Leonardo Da Vinci self portrait Read the rest of this entry

Hieronymus Fabricius “The Father of Embryology”


Hieronymus Fabricius was an Italian born in Acquapendente, Latium,  in 1533. He died in his Villa, La Montagnola, in 1619 at the age of 86. His father was Fabrico Fabrici. The family is said to have been noble and once-wealthy, but in decline at the time of Fabrici’s youth, though not impoverished. He studied Latin, logic, and philosophy, and then medicine in Padua for nine years, and took his degree in medicine and philosophy in about 1559. Read the rest of this entry

Research Terminology and Important Concepts


This is probably one of the less interesting posts. Just a blob of information. The rote memory kind of stuff. Yay! (cough) Read the rest of this entry

What is Ethics?


Ethics is the portion of philosophical thought that considers what is right and wrong. Ethics is broken down into 3 categories: Metaethics, Normative Ethics and Applied Ethics. Metaethics is abstract and related to a wide range of more specific practical questions. Such as “What is truth?” Normative ethics is the study of ethical action and is founded upon metaethical discussions. Simply stated, normative ethics refers to standards of behavior that tell us how human beings ought to act in the many situations in which they find themselves. Applied ethics is a discipline of philosophy that attempts to apply ethical theory to real-life situation. The discipline has many specialized fields, such as biomedical ethics. Read the rest of this entry

Homage to Catalonia


The author of ‘Homage to Catalonia’ did not grasp the wider context and provided a partial, partisan versionUnleashed on 17 July 1936 by a military coup against the democratically elected government of the Second Republic, the Spanish civil war was a rehearsal for the second world war. The British, French and American governments stood aside…

via George Orwell’s Spanish civil war memoir is a classic, but is it bad history? — The Guardian Read the rest of this entry

William Harvey: The Father of Modern Physiology (Part 2)


Read Part One

So,  we’ll let’s take a quick look at some of the other people who contributed to cardiac knowledge!

The earliest known writings on the circulatory system are found in the Ebers Papyrus (16th century BCE), an ancient Egyptian medical papyrus containing over 700 Read the rest of this entry

William Harvey: The Father of Modern Physiology (Part 1)


William Harvey was born April 1, 1578. Harvey had seven brothers and two sisters, and his father, Thomas Harvey, was a farmer and landowner. His father then became the mayor of Folkestone England after having worked there for years as a jurat (someone in the legal field that witnesses documents being signed). While living in Folkestone, he learned Latin, which was the beginning of his medical education. Harvey attended the King’s School in Canterbury, Kent, from 1588 to 1593. He then went on to study arts and medicine at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, from 1593 to 1599. He continued his studies at the University of Padua, the leading European medical school at the time. He became a student of Italian anatomist and surgeon Hieronymous Fabricius, who had a considerable influence on Harvey. It is also likely that Harvey was taught by Italian philosopher Cesare Cremonini, a prominent follower of Aristotle. Read the rest of this entry

Do No Harm


Of all the Hippocratic writings the Oath, in spite of its shortness, is perhaps the most interesting to the general reader and also to the modern medical man. The idea of not doing the patient harm is within the Oath, but the phrase “Do No Harm” is not. Whatever its origin, it is a landmark in the ethics of medicine. It is a declaration that the purpose of medical knowledge is solely for healing. The Oath is the oldest known written work that speaks to Biomedical Ethics. And the idea that it expresses is still at the center of all bio-ethical debates today. Read the rest of this entry

Mistakes & Adventures

What I've always wanted

BioethicsBytes

Multimedia resources for teaching bioethics

Rediskot

Art shenanigans of Xenia Bougaevsky

Crochet Thread

A Modern Interpretation of Vintage Crochet by Ann Reillet Featuring Many Original Designs

Elzeblaadje

Crafting with hook, needle and yarn

Son's Popkes

Crochet animal patterns designed by Sonja van der Wijk